Saturday, June 11, 2011

Gluten Free, Egg Free, Yeast Free Bread


Today I set out to make a bread without yeast.  Searching the fridge, I discovered it would be made without eggs also, which is ok with me due to my heart condition and hereditary high cholesterol.

Now, gluten free bread baking used to seem like such an overwhelming task to me but I was sure that I could come up with one that I liked.  I have had success with yeast breads in the past although they always had that strong yeast flavor.  This morning I decided I wanted to try a, for lack of a better word, a soda bread.

With fearlessness I began jotting down notes, scratching out ingredients, rearranging quantities, adding new ingredients, checking the cupboards to see what I had to work with.  This went on for about an hour.  Once the recipe was set in "pencil", I got out my bowls and began my mad scientist creation for the day.

When I put it into the oven, I must admit, I was scared.  I mean, I could have just wasted the morning and the better part of the afternoon, not to mention a mess of ingredients.  Nothing I could do now but wait.

The timer ticked by, then BEEP, BEEP, BEEP, BEEP.  I was excited and ran into the kitchen, threw open the oven and there it sat.

The loaf had risen.  It had browned.  It smelled delicious.  Ouch!  It needed to cool.  =]

After cooling on the rack I thumped it and it sounded done.  My excitement grew.

When I sliced it open I was pleased with the texture and durability.  The crust was crusty and the inside was moist, but not too moist.  I made a sandwich, and after one bite I was ready to dance and sing!  I felt like I had discovered the holy grail. LOL

This is by far, hands down, the BEST bread that I have made or eaten since going gluten free!  Please give it a try and post your thoughts here.  It is easy to make and completely delicious.

Ingredients

Group 1 : Dry Ingredients
3/4 cup brown rice flour
3/4 cup sweet rice flour
1/2 cup potato starch (not potato flour)
1/2 cup tapioca flour
1/4 cup gluten free oat flour
1/4 cup cornstarch
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
3 teaspoons xanthan gum
3 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt

Group 2 : Wet
1 cup 2% milk
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

Group 3 : Egg Replacement
2 tablespoons flaxseed meal
6 tablespoons hot water

1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/4 cup water
1 tablespoon melted butter

Begin by whisking the dry ingredients (group 1) together in your stand mixer bowl thoroughly.  Set this aside for now.

Next mix the milk and apple cider together and allow to warm slightly on the counter.

Next step is to mix the flaxseed meal and the hot water together from group 3.  Set this aside to get goopy.

Once the flaxseed meal slurry is the right consistency, mix into it the 1/2 cup olive oil and stir together thoroughly.  Then mix in the milk, then the water, stirring together after each addition.  Now make a well in the flour mixture that is already in your stand mixer bowl.  Pour the liquid into the well and using your dough hooks mix until all the liquid is incorporated into the flour.  It should be thick and hold together in a ball.

By now, you should have preheated your oven to 375 degrees and greased a cookie sheet with olive oil.  Turn the dough out onto the middle of the cookie sheet and with olive oiled hands smooth and shape the dough into a ball.  With a sharp knife score the top in an X but not too deep.

At this point I brushed the top with melted butter and placed it into the 375 degree oven for 1 hour.
When done, remove the bread loaf and put it on a wire rack to cool.

I allowed it to cool completely before slicing into it.  I made a chicken salad sandwich and it held together remarkably well while being eaten.  I loved it!

I know you will love this bread too.

Enjoy!.

      

103 comments:

  1. have you tried it without oats? How long did it stay "fresh"? Thanks.

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  2. This is made with oat flour, but I haven't tossed in any whole oats. This loaf stayed fresh, on the counter loosely wrapped in foil, for about 4 days of sandwiches.

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  3. This bread is the best I have had in 2 years of trying to find the "perfect" bread. I used my USA Pan 4x8 and it was perfect with alittle over 1 hour of cooking time. I think this recipe will work for any nuts and fruits added to the dough. I am going to try it as a pizza dough and french bread dough too. Thank you so much for sharing this recipe Shawn.

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  4. Thanks Rocky, This is mine and Shawn's favorite bread recipe so far too!

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  5. I made this bread again for Christmas dinner except I "tweaked" it. I turned it into a mock rye bread. I have come to the conclusion this bread dough can holdup to any abuse. I added 2 tbl. unsweetened cocoa, 2 tsp. finely grated orange peel, 2 tsp. caraway seeds, 1 tsp. minced dried onion and 1/2 tsp. dried dill weed. I baked it in a 4x8 USA pan at 350 degrees for 62 minutes. I did not alter the original bread recipe at all. The crust was to die for. So crunchy and the inside was perfect. Thank you so much for this recipe..xo

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  6. I love your creative spirit. <3 This is definitely a bread that can be tweaked and changed with many add-in options. I did it once with grated cheddar cheese and jalapeno's! Yummy!
    Thanks for posting your "tweaks" Sounds delicious!

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  7. I made this bread today substituting Silk coconut milk for the milk. I was also out of potato starch and sweet rice flour so I just increased the other starches and flours to make up the difference. It tasted great, BUT, it didn't develop a cohesive crust and wouldn't quite hold together as good for a sandwich.

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  8. Is there any reason why this could not be baked in a bread pan to make it more like a loaf rather than on a baking sheet? I made it today and it's amazing!

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  9. Sandra, many people tell me they bake it in 4x8 bread pans and have great results doing so. I believe they increase the cooking time ever so slightly. I just prefer an artisanal loaf. I'm glad you liked it. =]

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  10. What could I use in place of the oat flour??

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  11. Sweet white sorghum flour would be a suitable replacement for the certified gluten free oat flour.

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  12. Oh and I also replaced the sugar with unsweetened applesauce since I can't have sugar.

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  13. Good to hear your substitution Sandra. Thanks for posting. I have swapped the sugar for some honey before. As some readers point out this recipe is a workhorse and can take all sorts of abuse and still turn out a good loaf. Enjoy!

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  14. This looks like a great recipe!

    Sandra, how much applesauce did you use?

    Shawn, how much honey did you use?

    I am also considering using coconut milk from a can, since I can't do dairy. What other kinds of milk can I use for this recipe?
    I am considering coconut milk, to make up for the fat in cow's milk. Will using other kinds of milk make this recipe gooey? I'm not sure if all milk substitutions are created equal.

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  15. I have made this recipe with Almond Breeze almond milk and with SILK soy milk, both with good results. They did not make the recipe "gooey" however the crust was lighter in color and less "crusty". When i've made it with honey, I didn't really measure (I know, shame on me) I would guesstimate about 2 or 3 tablespoons.

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  16. What would happen if I just left out the flax seed meal? Is there a good substitute for it? And, have your tried Rice Milk?

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  17. The flax seed meal is your egg replacement, so it is acting as a binder and a leavener. You could use a slurry of chia seeds if there is an allergy to the flax. I haven't personally tried rice milk yet in this recipe, please let me know how it turns out. =]

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  18. Thanks for your reply. I have never purchased or even seen chia. It is worth looking for as I have a problem digesting flax. I have used 1 tbsp of tapioca starch with 1/4 tsp of baking powder with 3 - 4 tbsp of water for an egg replacement. I wonder if that would work in this recipe.
    Marg

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  19. I recently tested this recipe with Hemp milk with great results. =]

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  20. Shawn,
    Really excited to try your recipe. One glitch,however, can't seem to be able to locate sweet rice flour.
    Will white rice flour do? Thanks..................

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  21. You can substitute, however, the result won't be exactly the same. Sweet Rice flour (sometimes called glutinous rice flour) is very fine ground and has a glue like property of stickiness which helps inn the final texture of the loaf. I find it more often in Asian markets sometimes labeled "mochiko". Flying Dragon makes my favorite, but Bob's Red Mill is what I use most often. Hope this helps.

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  22. Hi there, I have just come across your recipe and I am super excited as I am allergic to wheat, corn, eggs, dairy & yeast!!! argh I know.
    Anyway... I was wondering what you think I might be able to substitute for the cornstarch?

    thanks so much Em

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  23. Hi,
    I use arrowroot in place of cornstarch quite often with great results. Some might argue that arrowroot is the much healthier option.

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  24. Great thanks I am going to give it a whirl! will let you know how I go :D

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  25. Hi Again, I made some of your bread today, I made a few substitutions.
    I changed the cornstarch to arrowroot as per your suggestion. I changed the xanthan gum to guar gum and used light soy milk instead of dairy and brushed the top of the bread with melted nuttelex and OMG IT IS AMAZING. I just enjoyed a piece toasted with some ABC spread. Thanks so much for the great recipe. I am really happy with how it has turned out. Have you ever tried it in a bread maker? thanks Em

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  26. Thanks Em, I'm very glad you enjoyed it and happy your substitutions worked out. I have not tried this recipe in a bread maker. (I really wish I had one.)

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  27. This bread turned out great!! These were my modifications: Honey instead of sugar, arrowroot instead of potato starch and corn starch, sorghum instead of oat flour, almond milk, coconut oil, vegan butter and I baked it in a bread pan lined with parchment paper. I am also at an elevation of 5300 ft. Very good bread!! Thank you for posting!!
    ~ Alli

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  28. I came across your recipe looking for an egg-free, yeast-free recipe pizza crust. That turned out great! So I tried this bread recipe. I used Silk Coconut milk as I'm allergic to dairy and Earth Balance Soy-free margarine for the crust. I decided to use some of the mineral water I had left from the pizza crust to see if it would help with the leavening. the crust wasn't quite as brown as yours and it was just a big gummy inside, which I actually think was due to our high humid conditions right now. Otherwise, OMG! I will try cooking it a bit longer next time. BTW, it actually had air bubbles, I think from the mineral water. THANKS!

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  29. big should be BIT. It was a bit gummy. Sorry for the typo!

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  30. I'm very excited to try this recipe. My daughter cannot have wheat, yeast or eggs. It makes sandwich bread almost in possible. I have gotten pretty good with corn bread though but this sounds like a fabulous option for us.

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  31. I'm having a hard time making this bread. It's crunchy and fabulous on the outside but not quite done on the inside. The first time we made it like an artisan bread - didn't cook it long enough as it was looking really crunchy. This last time made it in a 4 x 8 bread pan at 350 for 62 minutes then added another 10 minutes to the cooking time. We'll try one more time- 62 minutes at 375 and hopefully it will work this time.

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    1. Sorry to hear this. Are you making any substitutions to the original recipe? As a 'workhorse' recipe this usually holds up great to any substitutions or additions. I'm at a loss. I always bake the artisan style loaf using variations on the above recipe with great results.

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    2. Also- I used rice milk and extra white rice flour instead of the oat flour. Basically the same recipe except for rice milk.

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    3. Ok, what I think went wrong is the sweet rice flour acts as a starch, and the oat flour is a whole grain. Try replacing the oat flour with additional brown rice flour instead. An improper balance of grains and starches will seem gummy and underdone. I hope that helps.

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    4. Thanks I'll try replacing with the brown rice flour next time I make it.

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  32. ECSTASY!! It has stayed moist and held together for two weeks in the fridge as I've been eking it out with only a slice or two per day. Made it in a bread pan; might use a smaller pan today, and plan to add caraway, ground poppy seed, orange peel, and cranberries. Ground chia should work instead of the flax. I'm at 4,700 feet, so I lengthened the baking time to 1½ hours and reduced the heat by 25°. (I wondered if that was the problem for those who got gloopy centers.) Oh, and hand mixing worked fine (no stand mixer here). ABUNDANT GRATITUDE to Shawn and all those who helped him expand by leaving questions and comments.

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  33. This bread sounds so yummy, I can't wait to try it.
    My daughter is GF, YF, DF and also can't have apples. What can I replace the apple cider vinegar with?

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    1. You can always substitute apple cider vinegar with lemon juice in recipe's like this, with about the same results. Some people like the flavor of the lemon juice better too.

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    2. Thank you so much Shawn for this suggestion.
      We will definitely be trying this.

      Thanks again,
      Debbie

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  34. Has anyone tried using eggs? If so, how many?
    Thanks! :)

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    1. The egg replacement I use is 1 TBS flax seed meal + 3 tbs hot water = 1 egg. So for this recipe simply use 2 eggs instead of the flax seed meal.

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  35. Great recipe for people with food intolerances and alergies. I baked a similar yeast free eggs free gluten free xantan gum free guar gum free (generally, it's a free bread). I used flax seed with hot water as egg replacement, mix of gluten free flour, corn flour and buttermilk. Excellent bread. But next day it was too sour with strong taste of buttermilk. Next time I'll do it without buttermilk. Thanks for idea!

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  36. I have a question. I just baked the bread and it taste GREAT! wonderful texture too, but it exploded in the oven, The top kind off ripped from the bottom. Any suggestions why?

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    1. I've never had that happen. I always bake it as an artisanal loaf, not in a bread pan. I make the criss cross cuts in the top and it prevents that.

      Try oiling the loaf more, if the top dries out too fast while rising it can become too dry to allow for more expansion when cooking and it rips. This is the most common cause when using the oven to rise the loaf before baking. You could also try leaving the oven door open a crack while rising to reduce the heat a little more.

      Hope this helps.

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    2. Thank you for the suggestions Ill give it a try tomorrow and let you know how it works!

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  37. Has anyone tried this in a break machine? I bought one of the breadmachines with a gluten free seeing (and only use it for gluten free items!) Thanks!

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  38. Hi there thanks for your site and sharing it with all of us!! This bread recipe is the first one i amtrying. Really hope mine turns out as well. My son just got diagnosed by a naturopathic doctor to be dairy, wheat/gluten/ egg, and yeast intolerant! I subsituted the milk with full cream coconut milk. I wanted to know if I live in a higher altitude should I lower the temperature ? i live in Calgary Alberta, it's similar to colorado I think. Thanks !!!!

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  39. Hi Shawn .. Tried this recipe due to my gluten free, dairy free and egg free restrictions, and due to my corn sensitivity I substituted with arrow root starch and yummy!! My question is how would I go about finding the total calories, carbs, fiver, etc for this bread?? Thanks

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    1. Try this website link, enter the recipe including the substitutions you made. http://recipes.sparkpeople.com/recipe-calculator.asp

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  40. Hello, just made this recipe for the first time. I must say the smell and taste is wonderful! The texture is better than any GF yeast bread I've made. We eat Dr. John Mcdougall's diet so we do not eat oil. I subbed 1/4 cup of almond yogurt for the 1/2 cup of oil. I also used arrowroot instead of cornstarch. I baked the bread for 1 hour. It is too moist. I can cut two slices then I have to wash the goo off the knife. Any suggestions for what to replace the oil with? Next time I will bake longer as I will definitely make this again. Also, Shawn do you use an instant thermometer to see if the bread is done baking? Just wondering if I need to buy one.

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  41. Cold pressed extra virgin olive oil is one of the healthiest ingredients on the planet for anybody, especially people like me with hereditary high cholesterol. It cleans the bad cholesterol out. I am currently unaware of any substitute for EVOO that would work in this recipe for texture and retain the health benefits. Yes, now I use a thermometer, I used to just guess and thump, but recently bought a thermometer.

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    1. A substitute for the EVOO is coconut oil. Works perfect :)

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  42. Hi Shawn, thank you so much for this recipe. I've been baking gluten-free for about 4 years, and this is the best recipe I've ever tasted. Phenomenal. My whole family will appreciate it. I only had one starch, so I subbed tapioca starch for the others, and subbed sorghum flour for the oat flour. I was lazy and didn't melt the butter, but added all olive oil. Freshly baked, the crust reminded me of scones of yesteryear before I went off gluten, and when I toast it, it crisps right up. I also just mixed this in a bowl instead of with a dough hook, and it turned out fine. I can't say enough about this recipe, and I will definitely be trying your others! Mei-Ling

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    1. Thank you. This is definitely a work horse recipe, it can take many substitutions. It makes an excellent mock rye, a raisin bread, a savory loaf, even a pizza dough with a little tweaking. (I made a jalapeno cheddar loaf with it.) Have fun with it.

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  43. I want to add to my comment that I also used eggs instead of flax eggs, and I used almond milk.

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  44. best gluten free bread, my husband really likes it to! I have mold allergies, so no vinegar for me used lemon juice. Also one egg. For the flours just rice, potato starch and tapioca flour. thanks

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  45. So I made the bread. I used buckwheat flour instead of oat flour, and soy milk. Left everything else as the recipe was. It rose fine, and looked perfect, but the texture was way off, somewhat like a gummy cake, and too sweet. Any idea what went wrong?

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    1. My guess is your choice in substitutes for the flour. Buckwheat tends to be much more dense than oat flour. 1 cup of oat flour weighs 90 grams while 1 cup of buckwheat flour weighs 120 grams. This huge difference can affect texture of the finished product. While the bread works well with soy milk, I think a reader pointed out earlier that the baking time should be increased slightly when making a non-dairy substitution. I hope this helps, but it is only speculative since I'm not there with you to troubleshoot things like climate, elevation, oven, etc.

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  46. How long is it supposed to take to mix the wet into the dry ingredients? Do you mix until just combined, or continue to mix until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl (like yeast bread does). Mine isn't doing this, is more like a cake batter than a dough. I did several substitutions -- brown rice flour for sweet rice flour, cornstarch for potato starch, buckwheat flour for oat flour, coconut flour for xanthan gum and coconut sugar for cane sugar. Any thoughts? I'm going to try to bake it in a loaf pan and see what happens.

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    1. The length of time mixing should not matter that much, you can not over mix like you can with a gluten flour as there is no "activating the gluten". Let me first start with some of your substitutions and see if we can come up with what went wrong. Brown rice flour, while also in the recipe, is not a suitable substitute for sweet rice flour since sweet rice flour acts as a starch and brown rice flour acts as a whole grain. One would think buckwheat flour for the oat flour would work, and it will, but since it is much denser you would need to substitute it by weight and not "cup for cup". I've not used coconut flour for xanthan gum so I can't say for sure, but I've used it in baking as a flour and it does not create the density or binding that xanthan gum does for this particular recipe. The sugar substitute is fine. If you have issues with xanthan gum try substituting a chia slurry or guar gum, both provide excellent binding.

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  47. Hi, I'm excited to try this recipe. I'm yeast intolerant, dairy intolerant and egg intolerant but not gluten intolerant. Just wondering what flours I can condense into plain flour our self raising flour? Any tips would be much appreciated as I seem to have no baking logic! Thanks!! Claire

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  48. Just made this today. Wonderful recipe! I subbed sorghum for the cornstarch and oat flour, coconut milk beverage for the milk, and arrowroot powder for the tapioca starch. The middle was a bit gummy, so I think I should bake it longer next time. Even my super picky 6 year old liked it! Thanks for sharing the recipe :)

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  49. HI Shawn. Thanks for this great recipe. We're just starting on our gluten-free, egg-free, and yeast-free (among other things) dietary adventure. I made your bread yesterday (with a couple of substitutions: high fiber coconut flour for the oat flour and coconut palm sugar for the regular sugar) and cut into it today. It came out perfect! It's wonderful and feels good in your tummy. :)

    My husband would like me to bake it in a loaf pan, but I was curious about that other person's experience with it exploding in the oven. Is that what happens if you bake this in a loaf pan? Also, I noticed that it really wants to stick to the foil and thought about using parchment paper with olive oil on it for ease of removal. Any thoughts and experiences?

    Thanks!

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    1. So far only one reader has had an issue with the top coming off, or at least only one that posted the issue. I've not had that problem and I have (now) baked it in a loaf pan. I used a foil tent over the top during the rising and made sure the pan was oily enough to prevent any sticking or pulling. As an artisanal loaf I just use an old seasoned cookie tin, but paper might work. I've not tried foil.

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  50. Our family has recently gone GFCF and yeast is also on our banned foods list. I have been searching for a recipe, and so far, every one has been a flop... until now. This bread is fantastic - smell, texture, taste, everything is exactly what I was looking for. I did make a few substitutions - I did not have sweet rice flour, so increased the brown rice flour, potato starch and tapioca starch by approx. 1/4 cup each. I also used chickpea flour instead of oat flour, rice milk instead of 2%, and guar gum in place of the xanthan gum. And I have a gas oven that runs hot, so I only baked for 45 minutes... And even with all of those changes, it was the best GF bread I have made, by far. Thank you!

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    1. You're welcome. Begin some more substitution experimenting, this recipe is a "work horse" and can take all kinds of additions and substitutions. Readers have made mock rye with it, sweet raisin bread with it, and I've made jalapeno cheddar loaf once with it. Enjoy.

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  51. looks good, however, my husband cannot have rice flour or flax seeds, or potato starch, dairy or eggs. HOw can I make this without those ingredients?

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    1. Brown rice flour can be replaced with oat flour or sorghum flour, etc (whole grain flours). Sweet rice flour in this recipe is a starch and can be replaced with another starch like tapioca, cornstarch, or arrowroot. Replace the dairy with any of your favorite dairy substitutes. for the eggs or flax slurry, try a chia seed slurry, prepared the same way. Any of these individual substitutes alone, or even 2-3 of them together will work in this recipe, it holds up well, however all of these substitutes together might change consistency in the end product. I say be fearless and give it a try, then post your results here to help others with the same issues. Good luck.

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  52. looks & sounds great. However i am intolerant to potato,lemon & apple, also cows milk,egg,yeast,gluten. Any suggestions? :)

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    1. Thanks. Sounds like the only thing in this that you cannot have is the potato starch and the milk. Simply substitute your favorite milk replacement and add extra cornstarch or tapioca, or even some arrowroot, to replace the potato starch.

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  53. Wondering if there's a difference between tapioca flour and tapioca starch? I followed the recipe almost to a T , but I did use tapioca starch in place of tapioca flour and cornstarch. The dough was more like a batter

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    1. Hmmm... Tapioca Flour/Starch is the same thing just different brands label it differently. Did you make any other substitutions? The dough is closer to a batter than a dough, but it can hold itself together to bake as an artisanal loaf when the xanthan gum and the flax slurry begin setting.

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  54. THANK YOU Shawn! I was looking for a reasonable egg and yeast free bread recipe for ages. My modifications:
    - didn't have xanthan gum and sweet rice flour, so I added egg replacer, sweet white sorghum and more tapioca starch
    - didn't have potato starch so substituted with tapioca starch
    - used rice milk (can't have dairy)
    - as I added a little more flour, I had to add an extra cup of oil/rice milk mix
    - baked it in a loaf pan for an hour

    When I took the bread out and cut it after 20 mins, it looked a little gooey in the middle, but then that quickly dried up. It is also a bit crumbly for a sandwich, but I don't mind at all. There is also a nice little crust. Overall a great bread that you can bake without some key ingredients - so thank you again! You really are a rock star! :)

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    1. Thank you for this recipe!

      We live in a rural area, so it took about three weeks for me to find all of the ingredients, but used everything according to the recipe.

      The end result tastes great, but is definitely more like a biscuit in texture than bread. The centre didn't fully cook though.

      I'm wondering if you might have suggestions for modifications for high-altitude cooking as I think our elevation may have affected the way it turned out.

      Thanks!

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    2. I developed this recipe while living in southwest Florida. I can easily believe at higher elevations that there is some texture and taste issues. The best concise advice I can give you is the same that you will find on King Arthur Flour's site. Here's a link as there are several small changes that need to be made and these changes vary on elevation. Here is the link: https://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipe/high-altitude-baking.html

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  55. if you modify this to use 2 eggs, can you use just the egg whites? i can have the whites, and not sure if eggs w/o the yolks will do the same for binding and leavening.

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    1. I've made it using egg whites. Add one egg extra if removing the yolks to make up for the liquid imbalance.

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  56. Happy dance!!!! This is just good! Used two eggs instead of the replacement but everything else was exact. Best bread I've had since being diagnosed two years ago! Texture is great, taste is awesome! I think there were real tears involved here.

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  57. Hi, id like to know what I can use in place of both rice flours and potato starch?

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    1. For the brown rice flour use a whole grain flour like Sorghum or Oat. For Sweet rice flour substitute a starch like corn, tapioca, arrowroot. For the potato starch substitute another starch. I choose particular flours for a particular consistency. These changes I have not tried, but should work.

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  58. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  59. You mentioned before that you started using a thermometer. To what temp should the bread be cooked?

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  60. Do you think that substituting the sweet rice flour with sweet potato flour work?

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    1. *would work okay?

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    2. I have never tried sweet potato flour. The sweet rice flour acts like a starch and can be easily replaced with starches like corn, tapioca, potato, and arrowroot. It seems the sweet potato is high in fiber, might not be a good match, but hey, experiment and let us all know how it works out.

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  61. I have just discovered your page, I made this bread and it was so good!! I am excited to try your other recipes, thanks so much!!

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  62. I am SO confused! I just made this twice, adding 2 eggs instead of the flax slurry, and both times it came out runny like pancake batter. The second go I added in more of a each flour and even left out the 1/4 c water and it STILL didn't form a ball! I've read over and over and over the recipe again and cannot figure out what the heck I'm doing wrong! Any ideas?!

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    1. To update, I used the second batch after adding more flour and skipping the 1/4 c of milk. I used a slurry of chia and flax instead of the xanthum gum, more tapioca in place of the corn starch and eggs instead of flax. It was better than the first batch, but still definitely not a ball. I put it in a bread pan and one 6 count muffin tin. It baked wonderfully and is delicious, but I still have no idea what happened!! Any ideas?! It's very humid here today. Perhaps that?

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  63. I was excited to make this my debut loaf after reading all the positive comments above. When I found out that I am allergic to wheat and my son to eggs on top of our dairy intolerance, I thought I would never have another artisan bread again. My dismay was saved by stumbling upon and semi-successfully making this bread. The taste, though kinda salty, was great, but somehow the texture was more like cornbread, dense and gooey even after extended baking. I did replace the milk with coconut milk and washed, dried and ground my own glutinous rice flour. Could they have been the reason for the heavy texture? Regardless, I am definitely going to give this another try, and would probably make this a weekly family exercise. Thank you!

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    1. when substituting coconut milk for milk in this recipe it ends to make it denser and gummy try substituting with water or seltzer water or if you must use coconut milk reduce the liquids

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    2. Ah, I c. I thought as much. Thanks for the tip! Btw, your response time is great and you seem very knowledgeable, offering great assessments and solutions.

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  64. I tried again last weekend with hazelnut milk and stopped adding liquid when the dough got too wet and ended up with 150mL liquid left and a dense loaf. Could it have been because of the 75% humidity?

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  65. Hi Shawn,

    Hope you are still around to reply to emails. Is there a replacement for the lemon juice and the apple cider? Also, I cannot have flax seed and cannot find chia seed. Is there a replacement for that?

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  66. Thank You so much for this great recipe!! I found it when I recently had to eliminate yeast, and am now addicted to this bread! I made it last night with these additions (chopped pecans, dried chart cherries, chopped candied ginger) and it is fantastic!

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  67. Hi, I tried your bread ages ago and loved it, and just came across the recipe again (after I moved overseas), and it's my new favorite. I am sensitive to tapioca, so I just put together all the starches and the heavier flours, and only use rice flour, potato starch, and glutinous rice flour. Instead of baking a boule, I divide the dough into 5-6 and flatten a bit to make scones. The crispy outside is the best, and this maximizes it. It comes out a bit mushy inside, but I just slice each scone in two and then put in the toaster oven to crisp further. Incredibly delicious with anything, including chicken salad open-faced sandwich. Thank you again!

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  68. Best gluten/yeast free bread recipe ive found so far :o)

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  69. Do you have any good muffin recipes? Gluten, yeast and egg free?

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  70. hi, I also can't have vinegar or lemon juice, is there a substitute? thanks

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  71. hi, I am just back to try the gluten free diet again, since I am also allergic to nickel I can't have any whole grain flours, oats or flax seeds. I just went with what I had on hand: brown rice flour, potato-tapioca starch and arrow root. Used kefir and sparkling water and olive oil. No xanthum gum, just baking powder and soda and psyllium. It turned out very good. So glad I found this page, thank you.

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  73. While it represents a noteworthy issue for Un-Fit Foodies, the bread wicker bin doesn't need to be an objective destroyer. Try not to stress - you'll locate simple about "requesting a plate of cut-up veggies" in lieu of bread (it's a complimentary administration, for the love of all that is pure and holy... also, bread is all the more tempting, at any rate).bread machine manual

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  74. Making bread from a bread machine is done using the same process of making bread by hand. We differentiate between the two when the mixing comes into play. bread machine recipes

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